Incredible Years: Assessment

Early-Onset Conduct Problems: Does Gender Make a Difference

Are the correlates for girls with early-onset conduct problems necessarily the same as for boys? It has been shown that externalizing symptoms such as disruptive, impulsive, hyperactive, inattentive, and overtly aggressive behaviors are important risk factors for boys’ continuing development of ODD and CD, whereas internalizing symptoms are not. In the absence of evidence, one cannot assume that this is equally true for girls.

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Impact of Incredible Years on teacher perceptions of parent involvement: A latent transition analysis

Year: in press Bibliography: Thompson, A., Herman, K.C., Stormont, M., Reinke, W.M., & Webster-Stratton, C. (in press). Impact of Incredible Years on teacher perceptions of parent involvement: A latent transition analysis. Journal of School Psychology. [spacer] Abstract The purpose of the present study was to examine the impact of the Incredible Years® Teacher Classroom Management (IY.
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Improving teacher perceptions of parent involvement patterns: Findings from a group randomized trial

Year: in press Bibliography: Herman, K.C., & Reinke, W.M. (in press).  Improving teacher perceptions of parent involvement patterns: Findings from a group randomized trial.  School Psychology Quarterly. [spacer] Abstract For children with the most serious and persistent academic and behavior problems, parent involvement in education, particularly teacher perceptions of involvement, is essential to avert their.
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Incredible Years parent training: What changes, for whom, how, for how long?

Year: 2016 Bibliography: Sebra-Santos, M.J., Gaspar, M.F., Azevedo, A.F., Homem, T.C., Guerra, J., Martins, V., Leitão, S., Pimentel, M., Almeida, M., Moura-Ramos, M. (2016).  Incredible Years parent training: What changes, for whom, how, for how long?  Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 44, 93-104. DOI: 10.1016/j.appdev.2016.04.004. [spacer] Abstract The aims of this study were to examine the.
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Incredible Years parenting programme: cost-effectiveness and implementation

Year: 2016 Bibliography: Edwards, R.T., Jones, C., Berry, V., Charles, J., Linck, P., Bywater, T., &  Hutchings, J. (2016). Incredible Years parenting programme: cost-effectiveness and implementation. Journal of Children's Services, 11(1), 54-72. DOI: 10.1108/JCS-02-2015-0005. [spacer] Abstract Purpose - There is growing interest in the economic evaluation of public health prevention initiatives and increasing.
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Outcomes of a comparison study into a group-based infant parenting programme

Year: 2016
Bibliography: Jones, C.H., Erjavec, M., Viktor, S., Hutchings, J. (2016). Outcomes of a comparison study into a group-based infant parenting programme. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 55(11), 3309-3321.
DOI: 10.1007/S10826-016-0489-3

This paper reports on a quantitative evaluation of a group-based programme designed to promote parent infant attachment and child.

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Parenting a young child with conduct problems: New insights using qualitative methods


What is qualitative research: Why should we do it? After all, isn’t quantitative research the only “legitimate” method of scientific research – objective, verifiable, and methodologically rigorous? Does qualitative research have scientific integrity? Is it reliable? Valid? Generalizable? Can it add anything new to the findings of quantitative research? Is it publishable: After all haven’t psychology journals adhered almost exclusively to quantitative models of research?
These are some of the questions the first author of this paper asked herself when the second author suggested that they undertake a qualitative analysis of parents’ experiences living with their conduct-problem children.

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Parenting Practices and Children’s Socio-Emotional Development: A Study With Portuguese Community Preschool Age Children


A recent and compelling study entitled ‘Neurons to Neighborhoods’, conducted by the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the Institute of Medicine (USA) calls attention to the importance of early emotional development in young children. Based on a careful review of neuroscience and developmental science, it highlights compelling evidence that a child?s earliest experiences and relationships set the stage for how he or she manages feelings and impulses, and relates to others (Raver & Knitzer, 2002). This paper discusses data from studies of behavioural and emotional problems and prosocial behaviour in a community sample of 362 Portuguese preschool children (age 3 to 6 years) and examine how these problems vary, as hypothesized, with parental practices. Each mother/father completed the Portuguese translation of two measures: Parenting Practices Questionnaire (adapted from the Oregon Social Learning Centre?s discipline questionnaire and revised for young children by Webster-Stratton, Reid and Hammond, 2001); Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (Goodman, 1997). Implications for prevention and intervention, in terms of parenting education and support, and for the development of social policies are discussed. Key words: parental practices; emotional and behavioural problems; prosocial behaviour; preschool; parenting training; parental education; SDQ.

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Social Competence and Conduct Problems in Young Children: Issues in Assessment

Results suggest that young children with conduct problems have deficits in their social information processing awareness or interpretation of social cues – they overestimate their own social competence and misattribute hostile intent to others. Tests of cognitive prolem solving and observations of peer play interactions indicated that the children with conduct problems and significantly fewer postitive problem-solving strategies and positive social skills, more negative conflict management strategies and delayed play skills with peers.

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The extended school aged Incredible Years parent programme

Year: 2011 Bibliography: Hutchings, J., Bywater, T., Williams, M.E., Whitaker, C., Lane, E., & Shakespeare, K. (2011). The extended school aged Incredible Years parent programme. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 16(3), 136-143. DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-3588.2010.00590.x. [spacer] Abstract Developed to improve parenting skills, parenting programmes have been shown to be effective and cost-effective interventions for.
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The Incredible Years Parent Programs: Methods and Principles that Support Fidelity of Program Delivery

Year: 2015 Bibliography: Webster-Stratton, C., The Incredible Years Parent Programs: Methods and Principles that Support Fidelity of Program Delivery. in Evidence-Based Parenting Education: A Global Perspective. J. Ponzetti, Editor, 2015. Routledge. Author: Webster-Stratton [spacer] Abstract Social, emotional, and behavioral problems in young children are the most com­mon reason parents seek help from mental health professionals..
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The Incredible Years Series: A Review of the Independent Research Base

Year: 2015 Bibliography: Pidano, A.E. and A.R. Allen, The Incredible Years Series: A review of the independent research base. Journal of Child Family Studies, 2015. 24: p. 1898-1916. Authors: Pidano, Allen DOI: 10.1007/s10826-014-9991-7

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Abstract

The Incredible Years (IY) parent, teacher, and child training series, developed by Carolyn Webster-Stratton, has been studied extensively over.

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The Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program: Outcomes from a Group Randomized Trial

Year: 2016 Bibliography:  Reinke, W.M., Herman, K.C., & Dong, N. (2016). The Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program: Outcomes from a Group Randomized Trial. Manuscript submitted for publication. [spacer] Abstract This group randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluated the efficacy of Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program (IY TCM) on student social behavioral and academic outcomes among.
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The long-term effectiveness and clinical significance of three cost-effective training programs for families with conduct-problem children

Year: 1989 Bibliography: Webster-Stratton, C., Hollingsworth, T., & Kolpacoff, M. (1989). The long-term effectiveness and clinical significance of three cost-effective training programs for families with conduct-problem children. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 57(4), 550-553.
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Abstract We evaluated the long-term effectiveness of three cost-effective parent training programs for conduct-problem children. One.
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The Parent Infant Play Observation code (PIPOc): development and testing of a new positive parenting measure

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A recent UK government-commissioned report on early intervention stated that ?what parents do is more important than who they are? (Allen, 2011, p. xiv). The report emphasised the importance of support for families at disadvantage at an early age before behavioural and social problems become entrenched and more expensive to tackle. Children classified as securely attached in the first 12 to 18 months develop better peer relationships at pre-school (Sroufre, Fox, & Pankake, 1983) and achieve better academic outcomes (Pearson et al., 2011).

The increased emphasis on investing support for families before children enter school has increased the need for assessment tools that support and encourage positive parenting. Identifying the positive parental behaviours that promote healthy child development is challenging as many of the current observational codes have been designed for parents? interactions with older children. This article describes the development of a new observational code to analyse the behaviour of mothers playing with their baby in the first 18 months. The six predetermined positive parenting behaviours are analysed using video recordings from the home. Practitioners can be trained to use the code and a manual facilitates future researchers and clinicians to evaluate parent behaviour with their infant in a natural environment and with minimal disturbance to the family.

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